One Year at WordPress: The Most Viewed Posts/Series

My earlier attempts at blogging, before this past twelve months, were rather meager though I did post a considerable amount of material at my first site begun in September 2000.

 I appreciate how the blog has been received by old friends and new ones. Thank you for your patronage. I hope our dialogue can continue and grow over the coming years.

I initially decided to blog as part of my own therapy. Consequently, many of the early posts were about grief, suffering and recovery. I also wanted to post a complete record of my published writings (not yet complete), some lectures and even some academic classes (the Hermeneutics series is essentially that). So my blog is definitely on the “heavy” side of things, and intentionally so.

Consequently, I did not intend my blog to be a place to track my personal or family activities. It was, in essence, an adventure in substantial posts based on my years of teaching and reflection. But, as with anything, it has become a mixture though still heavily weighted to serious historical, theological and exegetical concerns. That, of course, means it has rather lengthy posts which I understand is anathema to authentic blogging.  :-)  But, then again, I never intended my blog to be a kind of daily family update, or pearl of wisdom (though would be a more difficult challenge than I am ready for), or even a detailed account of my journey through life. 

Instead, I have generally followed a couple of paths: (1) journeying through my cycles of grief and recovery with some theological content and (2) a resource for historical, biblical and theological studies.  The latter means it functions more as an encyclopedia than a “blog” in the common vernacular.  The former means it is an invitation to journey with me as we all share the experience of pain and hurt in a broken world.

I changed my theme apperance at some point because I wanted a framework which included a “search” feature so that visitors may search my posts for key words, phrases or texts. I hope some have found it useful. I know I have. I sometimes have to research my own posts to remember what I believe.  :-)  Yes, I am over 50.

To mark this first year, I have identified the top seven posts/series over the past year based on visits (comments considered as well). Here they are in case you missed them–ranked from seven to one.

7. Stone-Campbell Hermeneutics Series (#1 was the most popular). This surveyed the more significant influences and developments of heremenutics within Churches of Christ in the 19th and 20th centuries.

6.  A Reflection on Psalm 84 for those Grieving Loss: even the Valley of Weeping has springs of refreshment but this does not dispel the need to weep.

5.   I Will Change Your Name, a homily on Isaiah 62:1-5. Through spiritual recovery God changes names, particularly the names we have given ourselves or others gave us.

4.   K. C. Moser and Churches of Christ.  The theologian of grace for Churches of Christ in the 1930s-1960s, Moser’s impact on Churches of Christ is beyond estimating.

3.   “Meeting God at the Shack” Series (#5 was the most popular). This was my “pastoral” assessment of The Shack wherein I reflected on my own “shack” and my personal journey of recovery.

2.   “Theological Reflections on the Shack” Series (#4 was the most popular). This was my fundamentally positive “theological” assessment of The Shack.

1.   Divorced People–How Do They Feel?  How do you think they feel?  They hate divorce more than anyone except–perhaps–God.



12 Responses to “One Year at WordPress: The Most Viewed Posts/Series”

  1.   Terrell Lee Says:

    Your blog is quite unique as are you. Your reward for blogging cannot be measured in ways known to humans. Thanks.

    P.S. I do look foward to reading your thoughts about N.T. Wright’s Surprised by Hope. (hint, hint, hint). Someone we both know asked Dallas Willard a couple of years ago what he was reading. Answer: Everything N.T. Wright prints.

  2.   rich Says:

    terrell lee
    I have one question about/for n.t. Wright.
    and it would be the same question for our president seeking to reign in the finacial comunity.
    IT IS IMPOSIBLE TO LEGISLATE ETHICS.
    AS IT IS TO WARE A COLLAR AND TO UNDERSTAND OUR GOD’S IMPARCIATLY WITH ALL OF US THROUGH FAITH.

    IT WOULD BE LIKE CALLING JOHN MARK
    DOCTOR HICKS
    YOU PROBLEY HAVE ONE OF THOSE ALSO.

    PROBLY MAKES NO SENCE BUT THINK ON IT A LITTLE.

    blessings

    •   Terrell Lee Says:

      Rich,
      I’m probably not the best person to respond to you but it seems to me there are some matters of ethics that are innate to humans (moral law) and other matters that must be legislated. One popular author/speaker has written that the only kind of morals that exist are legislated morals. I don’t know that I’d go that far but it’s worth some reflection.

  3. Profile photo of Royce Ogle  Royce Says:

    I especially enjoyed #4 and admit I only discovered you about that time. I admire anyone who puts as much effort into writing and the obvious study necessary as you do.

    You mentioned recovery and grief. I don’t know your story but perhaps we have some things in common. My wife and I are in our 6th year of facilitating grief groups.

    I am glad that there is a you, a unique you, and not just one more cookie cutter blog in our blog fellowship.

    Royce

  4.   Warren Baldwin Says:

    I agree with Terrell (whom I haven’t communicated with in about 20 years – “hi” Terrell! Thanks for your friendship at HUGSR years ago). Feel free to keep your posts like they are. I like the “encyclopedia” nature of your blog. I’ve only gotten interested in blogging over the last few weeks. Previously, when I accessed a blog, like yours, it was for an essay or article for a class I was taking or teaching. I have particularly appreciated the Hermeneutics articles. Thanks for your work!
    Warren

  5.   clyde s. Says:

    Happy blogday, JMH–thanks for sharing your own story and reflections as well as the SCM stuff and theological hermeneutics, exegesis/sermons, etc.!

  6.   Carisse Says:

    Happy blogday, indeed (thanks for the phrase, Clyde!), and many happy returns.

  7. Profile photo of Paula Harrington  Paula Harrington Says:

    I just started visiting recently but have been informed and blessed by being here ;)

  8.   rich constant Says:

    THANKS TERRELL..

    i need all the help i can geet always feel free.
    i’m sick and my perspective is to change
    wheather i like it or not good ad vice is a is hard to find…

    blessings to you and all
    rich

  9.   rich constant Says:

    p.s.
    terrell
    dont ya just love this blog,that this guy is doin.
    :-)
    rich

  10.   Zach Cox Says:

    100,000 hits in one year; congratulations.

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