Luke 15: Jesus Seeks “Sinners”

The book unChristian alerted Christendom that it had an image problem with millennials. Christians are perceived as insensitive, judgmental and hypocritical. Some responses to the book  were skeptical and defensive. Others not only agreed that Christianity had an image problem but they went further. Christianity has a reality problem, that is, contemporary discipleship is often skin-deep and profoundly shallow.

This is not to say that there are no Jesus-followers whose discipleship is deeply rooted in practicing the kingdom of God. It is to say that Christianity’s image problem is often created by Jesus-followers who only know Jesus through the lens of American consumerist religion (“how will this benefit me?”), or American civil religion (“let’s get this country back on track!”), or isolationist separatism (“let’s withdraw from this God-forsaken world!”). Most importantly, this image is created by “disciples” who don’t really know Jesus and thus can’t follow him.

The clash between Christianity’s reality-based image problem and an authentic discipleship is perhaps best illustrated in how Christians tend to approach “sinners.” unChristian claims that it is precisely in this area that Christians are perceived as arrogant, insensitive and judgmental.

I know my reaction is immediately defensive, but my reflection tends to confirm the perceptions.

But before I proceed further, let me focus for a moment on what I mean by “sinners.” I place the word in quotations marks because I want to think about its meaning in the context of the Gospel of Luke. This is Luke’s language for outsiders. They are a class of people who are marginalized, ostracized and avoided by the religious elite who, in turn, influence the devoted faithful to distance themselves from such. They include not only prostitutes and tax collectors but also the poor, the prisoner, and the enslaved. These are the “last” of Jewish society who are intentionally and pervasively shunned by the most devout.

“Sinners,” then, in the Gospel of Luke refers to outsiders, to the unclean, to the powerless within the religious culture of Judaism. And this is the group which Jesus seeks; he seeks “sinners.” This, then, becomes the sore spot, the point of intense critical comment, on the part of the Pharisees and scribes.

This, they think, is Jesus’ weak spot. Cultural perception is on their side. Everyone resents favorable treatment of tax collectors.  Religious folk can make no sense of associating with prostitutes. The powerful wealthy fear any encouragement of the poor. Few might not begrudge a kindness for these groups on occasion, but few would honor the kind of hospitality Jesus shows them. Jesus “welcomes and eats with them” (Luke 15:2).

At bottom the parables of Luke 15 defend Jesus approach to “sinners.”

Jesus is the wealthy shepherd who will leave the ninety-nine to find the one that has wandered away. He is the impoverished widow who will turn the house upside down to find a lost silver coin. He is the fleet-footed father who runs to embrace a returning “sinner.”

Jesus is the good shepherd who joyfully slings the found sheep on his shoulder and calls his neighbors together to rejoice with him. Jesus is the excited woman who calls her friends to share her joy in finding her silver coin. He is the exuberant father who slaughtered the fattened calf to celebrate his son’s return.

What was lost has been found. This is reason to celebrate. Jesus underscores this by highlighting the joy heaven itself feels when “sinners” are found. Friends and neighbors rejoice with the shepherd, the woman and the father. The angels in heaven rejoice with them. God rejoices with them. But there is only one person who is not happy. The older brother….and, we should add, the Pharisees and scribes.

The shepherd rejoices….the woman rejoices…the father rejoices, but the brother is angry. Whereas the parables, up to this point, stress jubilation, the brother introduces a contrast that now becomes the climactic focus. It becomes the point. It becomes an invitation.

But the contrast is more dramatic that we realize with our traditional, western and American eyes. Like the Pharisees and scribes, we can certainly see the point of the first two parables. We may be somewhat surprised that a shepherd would leave ninety-nine in the “wilderness” (eremo) to search for only one. And we might be a bit surprised that a woman would turn her whole house upside down for a single coin. But we understand the joy and excitement that comes from the two finds.

What Jewish culture would not understand, however, is the behavior of the father. The division of property before the death of the father was severely discouraged in Second Temple Judaism as it put the family at risk should the family assets come under stress at a later time. The father risked his future by giving the inheritance early. This shamed the father as well as the son in the eyes of the village and clan.

Further, the father is willing to humiliate himself for the sake of his son. The Jerusalem Talmud says that anyone who loses their wealth to the Gentiles should be cut off from the people. The Talmud describes a ritual where a bowl filled with burnt nuts is broken in front of such offenders and the people announce their ban. While the village and clan would exclude this son, the father runs to meet him and welcomes him to a banquet table. The father humiliates himself by running and shames himself by receiving him when one might expect the patriarch of the family to wait in the shadows to receive his son in private. The father is willing to risk cultural critique for the sake of his son.

Why does the father cross these boundaries? Why does the father shame himself? The answer is a single word found in our text: compassion. Compassion moves the father to risk humiliation. It moves him to bear the shame his son deserves. It moves him to rejoice over what has been found. There is no anger. There is no suspicion. There is no dressing down. There is only surprising joy that does not care what others think.

Two different occasions in my memory bring this home for me. On one occasions I confessed sin to a small group of people. One of my elders was in that group and when he heard my confession he came over to me, hugged me, kissed me and kneeled before me in loving forgiveness. That brother knew the father’s compassion. On another occasion, a person whom I deeply loved confessed sin to a couple of his preacher friends and after that confession they never spoke to him again. They did not understand the father’s love. They were more like the elder brother who thinks differently about this situation.

The elder brother is angry. At one level, this makes sense. Indeed, culturally, we would have expected the father to show a bit of anger himself. The young son had shamed the family, put the family at risk, wasted his inheritance, and returned home as a beggar. Can we trust him again? Does he not need to learn a lesson? Should he not have to prove himself? Anger makes sense.

Anger makes sense when there is no compassion. The elder brother reveals his heart when he confronts his father. His relationship with his father is not rooted in love but in servile fear. He has slaved for his father, resented how the father has seemingly withheld gifts from him, and now envies what the father is doing for the younger son. His anger attacks the younger son by particularizing the nature of his lustful waste (he was with prostitutes–he was with “sinners”!). The elder brother served his father out of fear in the hopes that he might be rewarded. He is angry because he fears the loss of his father’s love, or perhaps he fears the further diminishing of his inheritance. He is angry because he is afraid, and he is afraid because his relationship with his father is founded on reward rather than love.

The father, however, also has compassion for his elder son. He humiliated himself for his sake as well as for the younger son. The father leaves his place at the banquet to go out to plead with him. Where he might have demanded his son’s obedience, instead he affirms his love for him. He sees no distinction between what he has and what belongs to the son–the inheritance is all his. The father loves both his sons and wants nothing more than their reconciliation.

The father has two lost sons but one of them stayed home while the other went into the “far country.” The Father loves both lost sons and welcomes both to the table.

Jesus is the father. Jesus welcomes “sinners” (like the returning son) to the table. He runs to them, embraces them, shares gifts with them, and leads them to the table. He seeks them. He approaches them with hospitality, grace and joy. This angers the Pharisees and scribes. They think it inappropriate, unholy and dishonorable.

The difference is that Jesus loves “sinners.” He humbles himself in approaching others; he incarnates himself to join humanity at the table. He is sensitive to their shame as he bears the shame of their meeting and walk together just as he would bear the shame of the cross. He is forgiving as he eats with them in reconciling hospitality just as even now Jesus meets us at the Eucharistic table of joy and mercy.

Indeed, in the larger Christian story, the Father sends the Son into the far country to retrieve and reconcile sinners. The Son becomes a prodigal himself. The Son follows us into the brokenness of the world, is baptized with us, sits with us in the wilderness, goes to the tables of Pharisees and “sinners” alike, and dies in obedience to the way of the Father. We, too, are called to follow the Son into the prodigal far country to be with “sinners.” We are called to be the father in this story just as we have been the prodigal child as well.

Unfortunately, we are too often the elder sibling.  unChristian describes the elder sibling. Rather than demonstrating hospitality we tend to shun “others.” Rather than showing sensitivity we erupt in anger or we are at least indifferent to their situation. Rather than humbling ourselves to bear their shame we arrogantly demand they cross the street to meet us.

It is little wonder that Christians have an image problem. It is acute because we fail to image Jesus himself. Gandhi was right. The problem with Christianity is Christians.

Nevertheless, in his compassion Jesus endures the shame to invite us, the elder siblings, to join the celebration where we might learn to imitate his seeking so that heaven itself might be filled with joy.

*The essence of a sermon delivered at the ACU Summit on September 18, 2013.



6 Responses to “Luke 15: Jesus Seeks “Sinners””

  1.   rich constant Says:

    Unfortunately, we are too often the elder sibling. unChristian describes the elder sibling. Rather than demonstrating hospitality we tend to shun ?others.? Rather than showing sensitivity we erupt in anger or we are at least indifferent to their situation. Rather than humbling ourselves to bear their shame we arrogantly demand they cross the street to meet us.

    It is little wonder that Christians have an image problem. It is acute because we fail to image Jesus himself. Gandhi was right. The problem with Christianity is Christians.

    Nevertheless, in his compassion Jesus endures the shame to invite us, the elder siblings, to join the celebration where we might learn to imitate his seeking so that heaven itself might be filled with joy.

    •   rich constant Says:

      my computer went on the fritz
      anyway
      thanks so much for this lesson
      that i at times forget…
      although “church” to me has become gods hospital for those who realize just a little how we all deviate from gods good.(sarcastic)
      we all must at one time or another realize what this scripture makes us All, (and only by a promise kept, and words fulfilled, proved the faithfulness of the trinity will give mercy to the deviates that we are) and only made clean through that wonderful body that has ascended into the throne room by that faithfulness of the Father ,Son, and the SPIRIT that chose to dwell in each of the faithful that chose to reciprocate that love.
      EVEN while we are depraved. SINNERS.

      LITV TRANS.
      Rom 5:20 But Law came in besides, that the deviation might abound. But where sin abounded, grace much more abounded,
      Rom 5:21 that as sin ruled in death, so also grace might rule through righteousness to everlasting life, through Jesus Christ our Lord.

      •   rich constant Says:

        p.s.
        that”s a compared to what…..or maybe a reality check

        for a lot of people and couple of “preachers????”….” On another occasion, a person whom I deeply loved confessed sin to a couple of his preacher friends and after that confession they never spoke to him again.”
        may God continue to bless us all.

  2.   Clark Coleman Says:

    I doubt that most of us demonstrate the same attitude towards the modern equivalent of tax collectors and prostitutes that Jesus did. We have a clear call to repentance on that score.

    We also need to keep in mind that today, the tax collector and the prostitute want a “tolerance” that is defined as publicly stating that their behavior is just fine. They did not ask that of Jesus, nor did he offer it.

    Today, the prodigal son returns home and declares that we must all accept that he was merely living an alternative lifestyle, and if we do not accept that spending his money on prostitutes was an acceptable personal choice on his part, then we are hateful, judgmental and intolerant bigots.

    If you declare that God loves all people, all of us are sinners, and no sinner should consider himself superior to others, but you also declare that homosexuals should be celibate as well as declaring that heterosexuals should be monogamous, then a large number of the poll respondents who declared Christians to be “intolerant and judgmental” will continue to declare you to be intolerant and judgmental. Let us have no illusions that we will curry any favor with moral relativists, no matter how Christlike we become. That is not our motivation for becoming more Christlike. There are many in the world who will hate us still.

    We need to be aware that there is an uncompassionate, Pharisaic ditch over on one side of the narrow road we are trying to walk. We also need to suffer no illusions; there is a a ditch on the other side of the road, full of open acceptance of sin, and unless we jump into that ditch, we will be labeled as hateful bigots. Stay on the road, be Christlike, and do not be surprised that you are still called a “hater.”

  3.   rich constant Says:

    clark you are quite right

    Col 2:10 and having been filled, you are in Him, who is the Head of all rule and authority,
    Col 2:11 in whom also you were circumcised with a circumcision not made by hands, in the putting off of the body of the sins of the flesh, by the circumcision of Christ,
    Col 2:12 being buried with Him in baptism, in whom also you were raised through the faith of the working of God, raising Him from among the dead.
    Col 2:13 And you, being dead in the deviations and the uncircumcision of your flesh, He made alive together with Him, having forgiven you all the deviations,
    Col 2:14 blotting out the handwriting in the ordinances against us, which was contrary to us, even He has taken it out of the midst, nailing it to the cross;
    Col 2:15 having stripped the rulers and the authorities, He made a show of them in public, triumphing over them in it.

    although ,

    Rom 2:1 Wherefore thou art without excuse, O man, whosoever thou art that judgest: for wherein thou judges another, thou condemnest thyself; for thou that judgest dost practise the same things.
    Rom 2:2 And we know that the judgment of God is according to truth against them that practise such things.
    Rom 2:3 And reckonest thou this, O man, who judgest them that practise such things, and doest the same, that thou shalt escape the judgment of God?
    Rom 2:4 Or despisest thou the riches of his goodness and forbearance and longsuffering, not knowing that the goodness of God leadeth thee to repentance?
    Rom 2:5 but after thy hardness and impenitent heart treasurest up for thyself wrath in the day of wrath and revelation of the righteous judgment of God;
    Rom 2:6 who will render to every man according to his works:
    Rom 2:7 to them that by patience in well-doing seek for glory and honor and incorruption, eternal life:
    Rom 2:8 but unto them that are factious, and obey not the truth, but obey unrighteousness, shall be wrath and indignation,
    Rom 2:9 tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man that worketh evil, of the Jew first, and also of the Greek;
    Rom 2:10 but glory and honor and peace to every man that worketh good, to the Jew first, and also to the Greek:
    Rom 2:11 for there is no respect of persons with God.

    might just use a little compassion expressing those thoughts…

    blessings clark
    and all
    rich

  4.   rich constant Says:

    ya know i didn’t put in a few scriptures, although,(knowing what a knucklehead i am there’s Still hope for you) ONE, Should do it….????
    Jas 2:5
    Jas 2:6

    Jas 2:7 Do they not blaspheme the good Name called on you?
    Jas 2:8 If you truly fulfill the royal Law according to the Scripture, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” you do well. Lev. 19:18

    Jas 2:9 But if you have partiality you work sin, being reproved by the Law as transgressors.
    Jas 2:10 For whoever shall keep all the Law, but stumbles in one, he has become guilty of all.

    Jas 2:11 For He who said, “You shall not commit adultery,” also said, “You shall not murder.” Ex. 20:14, 13; Deut. 5:18, 17 But if you do not commit adultery, but commit murder, you have become a transgressor of the Law.
    Jas 2:12 So speak and so do as being about to be judged through a Law of freedom.
    Jas 2:13 For judgment will be without mercy to the one not doing mercy. And mercy rejoices over judgment.
    Jas 2:14
    Jas 2:15
    Jas 2:16
    Jas 2:17

    and add infinite item
    BOY OH BOY

    I COULD GO ON AND ON….
    GOD HELP ALL OF US deviates
    BUTT THEN
    he DIDN’T HE,

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